PREIMPLANTATION GENETIC SCREENING - PGS

PGS differs from PGD in that we are mainly looking for new defects in the number of chromosomes in embryos in couples that otherwise do not have genetic disorders.

 

PGS differs from PGD in that we are mainly looking for new defects in the number of chromosomes in embryos in couples that otherwise do not have genetic disorders.

By this method, we examine all 23 pairs of chromosomes contained in each healthy human embryo cell. As a result, we discover missing or unnecessary chromosomes in embryos. An excess chromosome is present in Down's, Edwards or Patau syndrome. A missing chromosome is a common cause of spontaneous abortions and unsuccessful in vitro fertilization. Choosing embryos without chromosomal defects therefore minimizes the number of failed IVF cycles and the birth risk of the affected child.

The course of PGS:

Approximately the fifth day after egg fertilization, several embryo cells are removed from the embryo and their DNA is examined in the genetic laboratory. Within PGS, we examine all 23 pairs of chromosomes and we focus mainly on whether some are missing or extra. If the embryo does not have the correct number of chromosomes, transferring it to the uterus would mean abortion or the birth of a severely disabled child.

The taking of as yet undifferentiated cells by an experienced embryologist cannot damage the embryo and has no effect on the ability of the embryo to nestle into the womb.

PGS is especially recommended:

  • for women over 35 years of age,
  • after repeated abortion,
  • after several failed IVF cycles,
  • for men with pathological forms of sperm,
  • who have undergone oncological treatment,

  • after the birth of a child with a congenital genetic defect,

  • in the case of the detection of chromosomal defects in one of the pair,

  • when using sperm obtained by MESA, TESE.

Do you have any question?

If you have any questions, do not hesitate to contact us.

Contact us
Write us